Category Archives: Eighteenth Century

Forensic Bach

The little known story of how one musician inadvertently aided in the development of a key area in forensic science. The story comes from Katherine Ramsland’s Beating the Devil’s Game—a must-read for anyone interested in the history of forensic science.

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Opera in the Time of Haydn

“The comely Grilletta would never roar out her lines in a lusty fortissimo. It is entirely out of character.” (Aria to Death, Chapter One) How did eighteenth-century audiences regard opera? We’re so used to prioritizing the music of an opera, … Continue reading

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Haydn and the Holiday Feast

How did Haydn, a devout Catholic, mark feast days? None of his early biographers make much mention of what he did. Feast Days of the diverse saints in the Roman Catholic calendar were, of course, marked in Vienna. Processions were … Continue reading

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Haydn and the Lost Operas of Monteverdi

On a twilight evening in October 1613, Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) was set upon by a band of thugs on the road from Mantua to Venice. I was researching the Haydn Mysteries when I came upon that tidbit, and I was … Continue reading

Posted in Aria to Death, Haydn, Haydn Mysteries, lost operas, Monteverdi, Musical Connections, Musicians | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments